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These conversations always differ depending on location and bloodlines in each state i've noticed.

so lets talk about it folks! You know i've seen alot of bloodlines and seen many of dogs run both hunting and trialing, but what i haven't seen (due to age and exp) is what beagling looked like 30, 20 even 10 years ago, so lets talk about it!!

what do you think has changed the most crucially in judging aspects over the years?

what has changed from then to now in reference to "what is a great rabbit dog" in a hunters point of view and what we are breeding for now?
 

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These conversations always differ depending on location and bloodlines in each state i've noticed.

so lets talk about it folks! You know i've seen alot of bloodlines and seen many of dogs run both hunting and trialing, but what i haven't seen (due to age and exp) is what beagling looked like 30, 20 even 10 years ago, so lets talk about it!!

what do you think has changed the most crucially in judging aspects over the years?

what has changed from then to now in reference to "what is a great rabbit dog" in a hunters point of view and what we are breeding for now?
I haven’t seen a lot as far as trends over time but Iv hunted with beagles
18 years since I was 12 lol! It could be the added use of the internet but Iv noticed a lot more guys are trying to breed a complete package not just an outstanding trait. They aren’t just breeding jump dogs and they aren’t even breeding big packs of dogs. It seems there are plenty of decent dogs and as usual a few outstanding ones and but less total rejects. Iv certainly noticed there are many more guys like myself who keep a dog or two at a time as pets and as hunting partners not just some hounds in a pen that get run during hunting season only. There is an influx in bird hunters changing over to rabbits there aren’t any birds here anymore. Another thing That Facebook and messaging boards have done is flooded hunter with info on bloodlines and stud dogs if you can spend the money you don’t have to weed through 25 dogs you aren’t happy with you can buy a gyp you like and breed her to the best stud you can find.
 

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so to give you relatively young pups some perspective. When I started messing with beagles in the late 70's the last thing a hunter wanted was a field trial dog. Field trial dog at that time was associated with brace dogs. You know the ones, supposed to bark on every track, and usually did, but would take forever to actually circle a rabbit.
 

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Yes trial dogs when I was a kid were walking talking dogs. Slow. Bloodlines we followed were just dogs that you seen and you bred to them hoping they would turn out the same. I think results were about the same then vs. now but internet gives you a broader gene pool. Put your time in on a dog, no dog gets to their potential on just genetics alone.
 

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Been messing with dogs for 57 years. Back then field trial dogs where walkie talkies. You could get a decent medium speed dog for cheap,but they lacked hunt usually. I did a lot of back yard breeding of grade dogs. I wanted,hunt,speed and close on the line dogs,that could produce the rabbit to the gun. Pretty much what we all want today. Stopped running grade dogs over 25 years ago. It funny how a man can change,I loved a fast close dog,now I love a slower gun dog brace style dog. Slower,steady and easily to handle. I guess that might has something to do with being 65. No matter what style you run nothing better than hearing a good steady run without any break downs.
 

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62 years old. Had dogs all my life. I think trial dogs are better than they were and hunting dogs are for the most part not as good. Why? I think there are more trial people that run a closer dog to a gun dog. They lack some hunt. Hunters buy these dogs and they do not like them. If you want a good hunting dog, buy or raise pups and teach them to hunt. Hunt I think is mostly a taught skill. JMO
 

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Been messing with dogs for 57 years. Back then field trial dogs where walkie talkies. You could get a decent medium speed dog for cheap,but they lacked hunt usually. I did a lot of back yard breeding of grade dogs. I wanted,hunt,speed and close on the line dogs,that could produce the rabbit to the gun. Pretty much what we all want today. Stopped running grade dogs over 25 years ago. It funny how a man can change,I loved a fast close dog,now I love a slower gun dog brace style dog. Slower,steady and easily to handle. I guess that might has something to do with being 65. No matter what style you run nothing better than hearing a good steady run without any break downs.


I tell ya what, I can certainly agree with that sir! younger beagler here, but thats exactly what i like in a hound!
 

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62 years old. Had dogs all my life. I think trial dogs are better than they were and hunting dogs are for the most part not as good. Why? I think there are more trial people that run a closer dog to a gun dog. They lack some hunt. Hunters buy these dogs and they do not like them. If you want a good hunting dog, buy or raise pups and teach them to hunt. Hunt I think is mostly a taught skill. JMO

so let me ask you this, what in your opinion is the biggest lacked skill today in teaching our hounds to hunt? i have a few novice ways i do things with pepperoni as pups that have helped my dogs learn to stay busy and hunt, lets hear some other advice and also opinions on why folks have stopped teach their hounds to hunt much here now in 2018....
 

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62 years old. Had dogs all my life. I think trial dogs are better than they were and hunting dogs are for the most part not as good. Why? I think there are more trial people that run a closer dog to a gun dog. They lack some hunt. Hunters buy these dogs and they do not like them. If you want a good hunting dog, buy or raise pups and teach them to hunt. Hunt I think is mostly a taught skill. JMO
How do you teach a dog to.hunt?
 

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I don't think you can "teach" a dog to hunt! However I think we can "train" a dog to be lazy,... Or rely on us to jump a rabbit for them! I'm guilty of it! when I was a kid,... (long time ago),... I was the brush buster! It must have stuck! To this day I still tend to get in the briars to see what my dogs are doing! The by product of this "trained" my dogs,... to let me jump the rabbit!

Extreme hunt and desire are products of breeding, or have to do mostly with bloodline! This to me seems to go hand in hand with, foot and drive!

I'll extend you this!,.... the more extreme drive,hunt, and speed you get,... the less line control your gonna have! Don't care who you are or what your bank account holds in it! YOU WILL GIVE UP SOMETHING!!!

Nextell cup cars run so dang fast,... they slam leave the darn track sometimes! My Toyota is much
slower,... But I could hold it to the floor til I ran outta gas and never once slide off the track! So which one is better?,...... Opinions will vary! Beagles are the same way,... If they never break down,... are they too slow? Noone can produce me a dog with 7 or 8 on the speed, and never break down on the track!

THATS WHAT WE ARE ALL AFTER,... I JUST DONT THINK GOD ALMIGHTY HAS MADE HIM YET!

BUT I'M GONNA KEEP LOOKIN!!!:)

Materjuice
 

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I know a guy that when running young dogs, runs them almost exclusively solo, brace some, and he dumps them out of the box and then gets back in his truck. Then just sit and wait. He wants his dogs independent and to know that they arent running a rabbit unless they find it themselves. And this is not laziness, this same guy has his brush chaps on when i run with him and he uses them to get in and see whats going on, hes running around here and there to get a better view. His dogs do hunt very hard. Dont know if this is teaching hunt but its sure teaching that its up to the dog to find its own game to run!
 

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I really don't think you can train a dog to be a jump dog. They either have it or don't. How many dogs have you ever had that are the complete package? I've had very few that where 10's on hunt and tracking. I've put together many small 2-5 dog packs that could produce the rabbits consistently to the gun. I am a firm believer of solo time. Getting back to the hunt,you ever have dogs that are very busy but their not jump dogs,that jump dog just got something that the rest don't. I had a Short Pro female (my last dog ,I'm now without any dogs)
Unbelievable track dog, 30 second break downs on a check,she was tied to the line,I could turn her loose and she would literally run a rabbit for as long as the rabbit wanted to run. But she didn't have much hunt or speed 5 -6 maybe. I hunted her solo for 4 years,she might have picked up speed if I ran her with another dog. She did get a little better at the hunt but never a jump dog. I had a easier time breeding speed into dogs than hunt. I think jump dogs are born not trained. I had a three dog pack two dogs father,daughter (Little Harvey) where excellent track dogs and ran with power,the third dog was a little stubby breed female that could find a rabbit in car wash. She was a jump dog supreme, I watched her look for the thickest brush there was and she'd go right for it. She was somewhat slower than the other two but she was the dog that started all the action. After the rabbit was up little Dolly ran at her leisure and would be 100 yards behind. She never got competitive. No it wasn't the perfect pack but it work for many years. I've had dogs that hunt like crazy but jump relatively a small number of rabbits,I've had other dogs skirt brair and thickets but stop on a dime and bust into there and produce a rabbit. I watched my Scout dog skirt the brush,and watch little Dolly bust her butt and go through that brush without producing a bunny. She just was a brush dog that produced a lot of bunnies but maybe lack nose if you can understand that.When Scout went in it was show time, he just could wind(air scent a rabbit)was he a jump dog? maybe to some but Dolly was the real deal. Over a 7-8 year period she probably jumped 75 percent. It's funny how you can put together a pack that works great.
 

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if you have to teach your dog to hunt----you got the wrong dog.
hunt is bred in and all you should have to do is expose the dog to the environment with rabbits in it.
dogs are bred better now than they ever was thanks to the internet and shared info. like anything --man can ruin a dog if he don't know how to train one.
when I set a dog on the ground---my job is done until he does his job----hunt-find rabbit and run the track line. if the dog wont do his job----he is culled and usually crosses over to the dark side ;-)
 

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if you have to teach your dog to hunt----you got the wrong dog.
hunt is bred in and all you should have to do is expose the dog to the environment with rabbits in it.
dogs are bred better now than they ever was thanks to the internet and shared info. like anything --man can ruin a dog if he don't know how to train one.
when I set a dog on the ground---my job is done until he does his job----hunt-find rabbit and run the track line. if the dog wont do his job----he is culled and usually crosses over to the dark side ;-)
 

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I believe people are breeding the mouth out of dogs they are so obsessed with no extra mouth. I bought a field trial dog that would bark once or twice every 100 yds or so but she could run one fast and I see post all the time complaining my year old pup will run but not open on track this is crazy a beagle supposed to bark and I also think the nose goes with this .
 

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For quite a while I culled any mouthy or non rabbit producing dogs and kept ones that had lots of hunt and grit. What I lost was nose, and now for the first time in 20 years of messing with grade dogs I'm looking at other folks breeding and bloodlines to bail me out with my self induced problems. On a hunt My dogs can make rabbits with authority, but cant always get them back to the gun. We get 50-60% to come back to the gun and loose more than I should. So in my experience the internet is helping me figure out what may be a good fit to add to what I run to compensate for the traits I lack----something I could not do (nor did I have sense to) 20 years ago.
 

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For quite a while I culled any mouthy or non rabbit producing dogs and kept ones that had lots of hunt and grit. What I lost was nose, and now for the first time in 20 years of messing with grade dogs I'm looking at other folks breeding and bloodlines to bail me out with my self induced problems. On a hunt My dogs can make rabbits with authority, but cant always get them back to the gun. We get 50-60% to come back to the gun and loose more than I should. So in my experience the internet is helping me figure out what may be a good fit to add to what I run to compensate for the traits I lack----something I could not do (nor did I have sense to) 20 years ago.
This is exactly what I was talking about .
 

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I do love dogs that are quiet as a mouse, real busy getting bloody tails, crawling and laying on their sides to get thru tight spots. Once they get one to shoot out and then they can make all the noise they want. It got me in trouble I liked it so much.
 
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