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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seen this on a Facebook group I’m in and thought it would be a good discussion. They are in no particular order I just copied the post.

The most important thing to have in a excellent Gundog is what??
A- Nose
B-Speed
C-Hunt
D- Brains
E- All of the above
 

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I really never look at it that way. If I have a hound that I like everything about I find a female that is equally good, then I may breed them.
I never breed to try and fix something in a hound. They have to be equal in all areas or I dont breed them. I don't breed much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I really never look at it that way. If I have a hound that I like everything about I find a female that is equally good, then I may breed them.
I never breed to try and fix something in a hound. They have to be equal in all areas or I dont breed them. I don't breed much.
I agree. When I go to breed a dog I don’t think I will look at it that way either when the time comes. There were a lot of different answers so I was just curious on opinions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
all of the above---brains/intelligence is priority
if they dont hunt~what do they use speed and nose on?
if they have speed it is useless with out nose
they have to have it all to get the job done~~~~~~jmo
I like that answer Mr. Will! I figure I’ll get alot of the same responses. As I feel most of the guys on here feel the same way. Maybe not all but it was interesting to me to see what people had to say.
 

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I have yet to see a perfect hound, so every cross I try to offset any weaknesses on one side with strengths from the other. I breed for everything on that list, with brains/intelligence being top priority (agree with Will). A couple of additional things I want are conformation and size. I will not use any hound without a certain level of conformation, and I want them big if I can get it.

Here’s a photo from this evening of some 7 week old puppies I hope will check off everything on my list....

56412
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have yet to see a perfect hound, so every cross I try to offset any weaknesses on one side with strengths from the other. I breed for everything on that list, with brains/intelligence being top priority (agree with Will). A couple of additional things I want are conformation and size. I will not use any hound without a certain level of conformation, and I want them big if I can get it.

Here’s a photo from this evening of some 7 week old puppies I hope will check off everything on my list....

View attachment 56412
Good looking pups huntsman!
 

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I will say all of the above, like Huntsman I like size, 15" females.
Another component is toughness, great instincts, long ears, confirmation, a great sense of smell.
A lot of what I posted carries over to the main post that Cf wrote.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I will say all of the above, like Huntsman I like size, 15" females.
Another component is toughness, great instincts, long ears, confirmation, a great sense of smell.
A lot of what I posted carries over to the main post that Cf wrote.
Foxxy, on the long ears is that just something you look for that you like or is there a reason behind it? That’s got me curious.
 

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Long ears will guide the scent to the dog, it moves the scent particles up for better smelling. Beagle ears are a little lower then other dogs which they use for their tracking ability. JMHO

My example, if you shoot a pheasant and wound it they somehow do not leave much scent for a dog to track. It was tough for my Springers, Britany, and GSP to track even though they had lots of pheasant experience. If I was close to home I would get a beagle to find the wounded pheasant. My female could smell it and track so it was not a loss. JMHO
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Long ears will guide the scent to the dog, it moves the scent particles up for better smelling. Beagle ears are a little lower then other dogs which they use for their tracking ability. JMHO

My example, if you shoot a pheasant and wound it they somehow do not leave much scent for a dog to track. It was tough for my Springers, Britany, and GSP to track even though they had lots of pheasant experience. If I was close to home I would get a beagle to find the wounded pheasant. My female could smell it and track so it was not a loss. JMHO
Thanks, I did not know that. I figured there was a reason. Interesting stuff!
 

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Out of that list I would go:
Brains
Hunt
Nose
Speed
Above all those things though I look for determination and desire in a pup. If I hide a piece of hotdog under a bucket I want the pup that is still there digging and rooting when all the other pups have give up. That is the dog that will dig down and keep a run going. They will also be the first one off the tailgate and the last one back to the truck because he has a desire to find that rabbit and not stop till it's over, one way or another.
I agree with what Mr. Will said. Now to go one step further what about a smart dog with a big nose that can run like a racehorse and stays busy when hunting but doesn't have enough desire to really dig down deep to find a rabbit and enough determination to stay the course when things get tough. How much is that dog really going to contribute to your pack when swimming through a swamp or wading through a foot of snow?
I will take a dog lacking in any one of the choices above but will go the extra mile over a flashy dog that won't see it to the end of the line.
Just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Out of that list I would go:
Brains
Hunt
Nose
Speed
Above all those things though I look for determination and desire in a pup. If I hide a piece of hotdog under a bucket I want the pup that is still there digging and rooting when all the other pups have give up. That is the dog that will dig down and keep a run going. They will also be the first one off the tailgate and the last one back to the truck because he has a desire to find that rabbit and not stop till it's over, one way or another.
I agree with what Mr. Will said. Now to go one step further what about a smart dog with a big nose that can run like a racehorse and stays busy when hunting but doesn't have enough desire to really dig down deep to find a rabbit and enough determination to stay the course when things get tough. How much is that dog really going to contribute to your pack when swimming through a swamp or wading through a foot of snow?
I will take a dog lacking in any one of the choices above but will go the extra mile over a flashy dog that won't see it to the end of the line.
Just my 2 cents.
I like what you said about the determination and drive. I feel like that is important to me also even though I’m still new to all this. One of the main reasons I put this on here is because I seen alot of guys pushing for nose. I understand a dog has to have a good nose to run a rabbit but the way I took it from alot of guys is if they have the nose the hunt and desire will come to them. Like I said I’m still new to this but I also feel that is a little far fetched also? Maybe I’m wrong I’m not sure.
 

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Hey CF- if you have question and are not knowing keep asking the questions, some one on this site will answer it for you.
It is such a combination of things that when you have that special beagle, you want more like it. Once you get them the poor Mr. Cotton tail has no chance. JMHO
 
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