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To me this is the correct way to answer any questions anyone has on judging. This is what the AKC has to say about Judging ACK Filed trials.

As hounds men and women do yourselves a favor and take a moment and read every line on this posted entry below.

Lastly if you care enough about field trials to complain I strongly suggest you count the costs, remove all excuses from you lips, do the hard work of getting in physical shape (NO MATTER YOU AGE) study for the judges test and go take it. Call all the clubs in you area and tell them you want to judge and make a positive difference.

Be part of the solution...… Not part of the problem...… Don't tell us...SHOW US!

Thank you


PROCEDURE 5. STANDARD FOR JUDGING5-A FOREWORD​


(1) The Beagle is a trailing hound whose purpose is to find game, to pursue it in an energetic and decisive manner, and to show a determination to account for it.


(2) All phases of its work should be approached eagerly, with a display of determination that indicates willingness to stay with any problem encountered until successful. Actions should appear deliberate and efficient, rather than haphazard or impulsive.


(3) To perform as desired, the Beagle must be endowed with a keen nose, a sound body, and an intelligent mind, and must have an intense enthusiasm for hunting.


(4) Beagle Field Trials are designed and conducted for the purpose of selecting those hounds that display sound quality and ability to the best advantage.


(5) This Standard of Performance contains descriptions of both desirable and faulty actions. Judges will use it as a guide in evaluating performances, and will credit or demerit performance to whatever degree their actions indicate quality or fault, and to the extent that these actions contribute to accomplishment, fail to contribute to accomplishment, or interfere with accomplishment.


(6) Judges should approach their work with the attitude that the future welfare of the breed is in their hands, and should make their findings and selections on a basis calculated toward keeping the Beagle useful for both field trials and hunting purposes.


5-B Definitions—Desirable Qualities​


Searching ability is evidenced by an aptitude to recognize promising cover and eagerness to explore it, regardless of hazards or discomfort. Hounds should search independently of each other, in an industrious manner, with sufficient range. In trials run under Brace or Small Pack Procedures, hounds should remain within control distance of the handler, and should be obedient to his commands.


Pursuing ability is shown by a proficiency for keeping control of the trail while making the best possible progress. Game should be pursued rather than merely followed, and actions should indicate a determined effort to make forward progress in the surest, most sensible manner by adjusting speed to correspond to conditions and circumstances. Actions should be positive and controlled, portraying sound judgment and skill. Progress should be proclaimed by tonguing. No hound can be too fast, provided the trail is clearly and accurately followed. At a check, hounds should work industriously, first close to where the loss occurred, then gradually and thoroughly extending the search further afield to regain the line.


Accuracy in trailing is the ability to keep consistent control of the trail while making the best possible progress. An accurate trailing hound will show a marked tendency to follow the trail with a minimum of weaving on and off, and will display an aptness to turn with the trail and to determine direction of game travel in a positive manner.


Proper use of voice is proclaiming all finds and denoting all forward progress by giving tongue, yet keeping silent when not in contact with scent that can be progressed. True tongue is honest claiming that running mates can depend on.


Endurance is the ability to compete throughout the duration of the hunt and to go on as long as may be necessary.


Adaptability means being able to adjust quickly to changes in scenting conditions and being able to work harmoniously with a variety of running mates. An adaptable hound will pursue its quarry as fast as conditions permit or as slowly as conditions demand. At a loss, it will first work close, and then, if necessary, move out gradually to recover the line.


Patience is a willingness to stay with any problem encountered as long as there is a possibility of achieving success in a workmanlike manner, rather than taking a chance of making the recovery more quickly through guesswork or gambling. Patience keeps a hound from bounding off and leaving work undone, and causes it to apply itself to the surest and safest methods in difficult situations.


Determination is that quality which causes a hound to succeed against severe odds. A determined hound has a purpose in mind and will overcome, through sheer perseverance, many obstacles that often frustrate less determined running mates. Determination and patience are closely related qualities and are generally found in the same hound. Determination keeps a hound at its work as long as there is a possibility of achievement and quite often long after its body has passed the peak of its endurance. Determination is desire in its most intense form.


Independence is the ability to be self-reliant and to refrain from becoming upset or influenced by the actions of faulty hounds. The proper degree of independence is displayed by the hound that concentrates on running its game with no undue concern for its running mates except to hark to them when they proclaim a find or indicate progress by tonguing. Tailing, or watching other hounds, is indication of lack of sufficient independence. Ignoring other hounds completely and refusing to hark to or move up with running mates is indication of too much independence.


Cooperation is the ability to work harmoniously with other hounds by doing as much of the work as possible in an honest, efficient manner, yet being aware of and honoring the accomplishments of running mates without jealousy or disruption of the chase.


Competitive spirit is the desire to outdo running mates. It is a borderline quality that is an asset only to the hound that is able to keep it under control and to concentrate on running the game rather than on beating other hounds. The overly competitive hound lacks such qualities as adaptability, patience, independence and cooperation, and in its desire to excel is seldom accurate.


Intelligence is that quality which influences a hound to apply its talents efficiently, in the manner of a skilled craftsman. The intelligent hound learns from experience and seldom wastes time repeating mistakes. Intelligence is indicated by ability to adapt to changes in scenting conditions, to adapt and to control its work with various types of running mates, and to apply sound working principles toward accomplishing the most under a variety of circumstances.


The hound that displays the aforementioned qualities would be considered the Ideal Beagle for all purposes afield, capable of serving as a field trial hound, a gun dog or a member of a pack, on either rabbit or hare.


5-C Definitions—29Faulty Actions​


Quitting is a serious fault deserving severe penalty and, in its extreme form, elimination. Quitting indicates lack of desire to hunt and succeed. It ranges from refusing to run, to such lesser forms as lack of perseverance, occasional letup of eagerness, and loafing or watching other hounds in difficult situations. Quitting is sometimes due to fatigue. Judges may temper their distaste when a hound becomes fatigued and eases off, if such a hound has been required to perform substantially longer than those with which it is running. During the running of a class, a hound may have to face several fresh competitors in succession. In such instances, a short rest period would be in order. Otherwise, Judges should expect hounds to be in condition to compete as long as necessary to prove their worthiness, and no hound that becomes unable to go on should place over any immediate running mate that is still able and willing to run.


Backtracking is the fault of following the trail in the wrong direction. If persisted in for any substantial time or distance it deserves elimination. However, hounds in competition sometimes take a backline momentarily, or are led into it by faulty running mates. Under these circumstances, Judges should show leniency toward the hound that becomes aware of its mistakes and makes a creditable correction. Judges should be very certain before penalizing a hound for backtracking and, if there is any doubt, take sufficient time to prove it to be either right or wrong. Backtracking indicates lack of ability to determine direction of game travel.


Ghost trailing is pretending to have contact with a trail and making progress where no trail exists, by going through all the actions that indicate true trailing. Some hounds are able to do this in a very convincing manner and Judges, if suspicious, should make the hound prove its claim.


Pottering is lack of effort or desire to make forward progress on the trail. Hesitating, listlessness, dawdling or lack of intent to make progress are marks of the potterer.


Babbling is excessive or unnecessary tonguing. The babbler often tongues the same trail over and over, or tongues from excitement when casting in attempting to regain the trail at losses.


Swinging is casting out too far and too soon from the last point of contact, without first making an attempt to regain scent near the loss. It is a gambling action, quite often indicating over-competitiveness or an attempt to gain unearned advantage over running mates.


Skirting is purposely leaving the trail in an attempt to gain a lead or avoid hazardous cover or hard work. It is cutting out and around true trailing mates in an attempt to intercept the trail ahead.


Leaving checks is failure to stay in the vicinity of a loss and attempt to work it out, bounding off in hopes of encountering the trail or new game. Leaving checks denotes lack of patience and perseverance.


Running mute is failure to give tongue when making progress on the line.


Tightness of mouth is a failure to give sufficient tongue when making progress. This will often be evidenced by the hound tightening up when pressed or when going away from a check.


Racing is attempting to outfoot running mates without regard for the trail. Racing hounds overshoot the turns and generally spend more time off the trail than on it.


Running hit or miss is attempting to make progress without maintaining continuous contact with the trail, or gambling to hit the trail ahead.


Lack of independence is a common fault that is shown by watching other hounds and allowing them to determine the course of action. Any action which indicates undue concern for other hounds, except when harking in, is cause for demerit.


Bounding off is rushing ahead when contact with scent is made, without properly determining direction of game travel.

5-D Credits

(1) Hounds shall be credited principally for their positive accomplishments. The extent of any credit should be governed by the magnitude of the accomplishment and the manner in which it is achieved. Credit is earned for searching ability, pursuing ability, accuracy in trailing, proper use of voice, endurance, adaptability, patience, determination, proper degree of independence, cooperation, controlled competitive spirit, intelligence displayed when searching or in solving problems encountered along the trail and success in accounting for game.

(2) When crediting hounds for working style or methods used to gain accomplishments, Judges should keep the purpose of the breed constantly in mind and be alert for hounds, deficient in ability, that make simple problems appear difficult. They also should guard against becoming impressed by fascinating actions that do not produce results. Credit for working style should be used chiefly to differentiate between successful performers, and should never be applied to a degree which might indicate that style or method has been preferred to accomplishment, except in instances where excessive faultiness is involved. Credit for any accomplishment should be in proportion to its contribution to the performance. Mere lack of fault is not grounds for credit. While faultiness is not to be considered lightly, the slightly faulty hound that succeeds should be preferred to the stylist that fails.

5-E Demerits

(1) Faults, mistakes, lack of accomplishment and apparent lack of intelligence shall be considered demerits and shall be penalized to whatever extent they interfere with or fail to contribute to a performance.
(2) Faults are undesirable traits indicating lack of sound quality, and shall be penalized in proportion to the degree of commitment, the frequency of repetition, and the distractions they afford running mates, as well as for the interruptions or lack of progress they cause during the performance. Quitting, backtracking, ghost trailing and running mute are the more serious faults. Pottering, swinging, skirting, babbling, leaving checks, racing, running in hit-or-miss fashion, tightness of mouth and lack of desire or ability to find and move game shall be considered demerits.

(3) Mistakes are erratic judgments, sometimes committed under pressure of competition and prompted by a desire to excel and sometimes due to influence of faulty running mates. Where mistakes are not committed with a frequency that would indicate lack of sound quality, consideration should be shown according to the hound’s aptitude for realizing its errors, and its efforts to overcome them.

(4) Lack of accomplishment is failure to get enough done to compare favorably with the competition, and is often due to lack of such qualities as determination, patience, intelligence or endurance. In instances where this is apparent, the penalty should be severe. Judgment on hounds that fail to accomplish as desired should be based on the circumstances under which the failure occurred and the determination and intelligence displayed in the effort to overcome it. Where failure is no fault of the hound, such as interference with the game or trail, or where a worthy hound encounters an especially hazardous or abnormal circumstance unlike anything the majority of contestants are expected to overcome, new game should be provided without penalty. Lack of intelligence is apparent in the hound that does not portray sound judgment and skill during its performance.


PROCEDURE 7. INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES​


7-A Whenever practicable, the hounds shall be cast to search for game, but the decision as to whether the hounds are to be cast or whether they are to be kept on leash until they are laid on a line where game has been sighted, shall be made by the Judges alone.


Note: At a brace/trio trial, for the first series the hounds shall be laid on the line in order drawn unless all handlers involved in the brace/trio agree to a different order. For second and subsequent series, the hounds shall be laid on the line in the order called back.


7-B Each heat shall be conducted in a manner best calculated to give the competitors equal opportunity to display the qualities under judgment. No hound shall be started except as part of a complete brace or trio at the start of a brace or trio in first series, or without a bracemate at the start of a brace in second and subsequent series. The Judges shall establish a reasonable time before dropping a hound that is missing after the start of a brace or trio. The hound or hounds called to complete a brace or trio in any series shall be under judgment. Any previous scoring received by such additional hound or hounds shall be cancelled, unless previously defeated.


When running a brace in any series, if a hound attacks its bracemate in a manner which, in the opinion of the Judges, renders it impossible for the non-offending hound to perform properly, the Judges shall order up the offender and run the non-offending hound until they are satisfied, calling for an additional rabbit or rabbits if required.


If at the start of a brace or trio, one or two of the hounds refuse to run, or if at any time before the completion of the judging of a brace or trio, one or two of the hounds become lost or quit, the Judges shall continue to run the remaining hound or hounds until they are satisfied, calling for an additional rabbit or rabbits if required.


When the hounds are running in trios, the Judges must order out of the trio any one hound (but not more than one) which in their opinion is found to disorganize the smooth running of the trio.


A Marshal may be appointed by the Field Trial Committee to accompany the Judges to assist them in picking up any hound that has been ordered out of the trio.


7-C When a hound gives signs of being on game, the Judges shall allow it opportunity to prove whether or not it is on true trail. Judges shall not penalize or fault a hound without ample proof. If reasonable doubt exists, the hound shall be given the benefit of the doubt.


7-D When the hounds have been laid on a line together or have been given an opportunity to hark in to one another in any series, this shall be considered


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as competition, except that when no hound opens, the brace or trio shall be given a second rabbit or hare unless the first rabbit or hare was seen by one of the Judges.


7-E Trailing game other than announced, such as pheasants or game animals, shall not be considered a demerit.


7-F Should a brace or trio become divided, the hounds going away on different rabbits or hares, the Judges shall order all hounds up and the brace or trio shall be put on game different from that previously run by any of the hounds.


7-G Judges shall demerit, but not eliminate, a hound in any series for the sole reason of losing game.


7-H When additional game is required, the search shall start at the point where the last game was found.


7-I After the running of first series has been completed, the Judges shall announce which hounds they wish to see in second series and no other hounds shall be called to run in second series following this announcement except in the case of an error by the Judges in identification of a hound, and except further that the Judges may call for an additional hound to replace any hound that has been measured out at second series or is absent for second series measuring. A club must advertise that at an event, second and subsequent series may be run in accord with the Procedures for Small Pack trials, but otherwise, second and subsequent series shall be run in Braces. In bracing the hounds in second series, the hound having the highest score from first series must be announced as the first hound in the first brace, and its bracemate shall be the next highest scored hound which has not been braced with it in first series. The remaining braces in second series and all braces in subsequent series shall be braced in the same manner. No two hounds shall be braced together if they have run in the same brace or trio in an earlier series.


7-J All hounds called for second series shall be considered as having an opportunity to win or place regardless of their relative positions when called back, except that no hound shall be placed higher than another placed hound by which it has previously been defeated in direct competition during the running of the class. In deciding whether one hound has defeated another in direct competition in second or subsequent series, the scoring of the two hounds in earlier series shall not be considered. After first series, the Judges shall run each brace until one hound in their opinion has clearly defeated the other, unless both hounds are so faulty as not to merit further consideration for placement. If required, additional rabbits may be given at the Judges’ discretion.


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7-K The Judges may announce the four placed hounds at any time after completion of second series, provided each placed hound has been defeated in direct competitor by the hound placed immediately above it. All placed hounds must have run in second series. No series, nor any part of any series, shall be rerun except for any part of a series which may have been affected by an error made by the Judges in bracing or in identification of a hound, and except further that the Judges may continue the running of a brace at a later time or on the following day if darkness or severe weather conditions make it necessary to pick up the hounds before the judging of that brace is completed.


7-L The Judges must agree on the scoring of each hound before starting the next brace or trio.


7-M Should there arise at any time during the running of a heat a question concerning the actual running of the hounds that is not provided for in these Procedures, the Judges shall handle the situation in a manner not contrary to these Procedures, and shall so decide the matter as to give each hound an equal opportunity.


7-N No owner or handler shall have any right to question or refuse to follow the Judges’ orders


7-O Handlers, while their hounds are down, shall go together and keep within sight of the Judges and each other when possible. When hounds are cast, a handler may speak or whistle to his hound or work it any way he may deem proper, if not contrary to these Procedures, but he shall not make any unnecessary noise, nor interfere with an opponent’s hound in any way. When hounds have been laid on a line together or have harked in to one another, the duties of the handlers shall cease until further instructed by the Judges. The handlers shall at all times keep back of the Judges and hounds unless otherwise instructed by the Judges. Judges shall enforce these requirements at all times.
 

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trialer are being short changed by AKC as much as any other problem.----the trialers job is take the dog to the field----identify the dog---cast the dog------your dog is then in the control of the judges and you have no control at all------THERE IS SUPPOSED TO BE TWO MARSHALS ~~ a field marshal and roving marshal
the field marshal keeps the gallery in their proper place----handles the dogs on the ground----under orders from the judges----the roving marshal prepares next pack--and follows judges orders and protocol
WHEN is the last time you saw marshals at a trial----doing the marshalling job??/

TOO MANY CLUBS~~ shut down some of the clubs and more judges would be available---classes would have higher numbers and dogs would finish sooner----personally, i would rather run in a class of 100 dogs than 10.
 

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To me this is the correct way to answer any questions anyone has on judging. This is what the AKC has to say about Judging ACK Filed trials.

As hounds men and women do yourselves a favor and take a moment and read every line on this posted entry below.

Lastly if you care enough about field trials to complain I strongly suggest you count the costs, remove all excuses from you lips, do the hard work of getting in physical shape (NO MATTER YOU AGE) study for the judges test and go take it. Call all the clubs in you area and tell them you want to judge and make a positive difference.

Be part of the solution...… Not part of the problem...… Don't tell us...SHOW US!

Thank you


PROCEDURE 5. STANDARD FOR JUDGING5-A FOREWORD​


(1) The Beagle is a trailing hound whose purpose is to find game, to pursue it in an energetic and decisive manner, and to show a determination to account for it.


(2) All phases of its work should be approached eagerly, with a display of determination that indicates willingness to stay with any problem encountered until successful. Actions should appear deliberate and efficient, rather than haphazard or impulsive.


(3) To perform as desired, the Beagle must be endowed with a keen nose, a sound body, and an intelligent mind, and must have an intense enthusiasm for hunting.


(4) Beagle Field Trials are designed and conducted for the purpose of selecting those hounds that display sound quality and ability to the best advantage.


(5) This Standard of Performance contains descriptions of both desirable and faulty actions. Judges will use it as a guide in evaluating performances, and will credit or demerit performance to whatever degree their actions indicate quality or fault, and to the extent that these actions contribute to accomplishment, fail to contribute to accomplishment, or interfere with accomplishment.


(6) Judges should approach their work with the attitude that the future welfare of the breed is in their hands, and should make their findings and selections on a basis calculated toward keeping the Beagle useful for both field trials and hunting purposes.


5-B Definitions—Desirable Qualities​


Searching ability is evidenced by an aptitude to recognize promising cover and eagerness to explore it, regardless of hazards or discomfort. Hounds should search independently of each other, in an industrious manner, with sufficient range. In trials run under Brace or Small Pack Procedures, hounds should remain within control distance of the handler, and should be obedient to his commands.


Pursuing ability is shown by a proficiency for keeping control of the trail while making the best possible progress. Game should be pursued rather than merely followed, and actions should indicate a determined effort to make forward progress in the surest, most sensible manner by adjusting speed to correspond to conditions and circumstances. Actions should be positive and controlled, portraying sound judgment and skill. Progress should be proclaimed by tonguing. No hound can be too fast, provided the trail is clearly and accurately followed. At a check, hounds should work industriously, first close to where the loss occurred, then gradually and thoroughly extending the search further afield to regain the line.


Accuracy in trailing is the ability to keep consistent control of the trail while making the best possible progress. An accurate trailing hound will show a marked tendency to follow the trail with a minimum of weaving on and off, and will display an aptness to turn with the trail and to determine direction of game travel in a positive manner.


Proper use of voice is proclaiming all finds and denoting all forward progress by giving tongue, yet keeping silent when not in contact with scent that can be progressed. True tongue is honest claiming that running mates can depend on.


Endurance is the ability to compete throughout the duration of the hunt and to go on as long as may be necessary.


Adaptability means being able to adjust quickly to changes in scenting conditions and being able to work harmoniously with a variety of running mates. An adaptable hound will pursue its quarry as fast as conditions permit or as slowly as conditions demand. At a loss, it will first work close, and then, if necessary, move out gradually to recover the line.


Patience is a willingness to stay with any problem encountered as long as there is a possibility of achieving success in a workmanlike manner, rather than taking a chance of making the recovery more quickly through guesswork or gambling. Patience keeps a hound from bounding off and leaving work undone, and causes it to apply itself to the surest and safest methods in difficult situations.


Determination is that quality which causes a hound to succeed against severe odds. A determined hound has a purpose in mind and will overcome, through sheer perseverance, many obstacles that often frustrate less determined running mates. Determination and patience are closely related qualities and are generally found in the same hound. Determination keeps a hound at its work as long as there is a possibility of achievement and quite often long after its body has passed the peak of its endurance. Determination is desire in its most intense form.


Independence is the ability to be self-reliant and to refrain from becoming upset or influenced by the actions of faulty hounds. The proper degree of independence is displayed by the hound that concentrates on running its game with no undue concern for its running mates except to hark to them when they proclaim a find or indicate progress by tonguing. Tailing, or watching other hounds, is indication of lack of sufficient independence. Ignoring other hounds completely and refusing to hark to or move up with running mates is indication of too much independence.


Cooperation is the ability to work harmoniously with other hounds by doing as much of the work as possible in an honest, efficient manner, yet being aware of and honoring the accomplishments of running mates without jealousy or disruption of the chase.


Competitive spirit is the desire to outdo running mates. It is a borderline quality that is an asset only to the hound that is able to keep it under control and to concentrate on running the game rather than on beating other hounds. The overly competitive hound lacks such qualities as adaptability, patience, independence and cooperation, and in its desire to excel is seldom accurate.


Intelligence is that quality which influences a hound to apply its talents efficiently, in the manner of a skilled craftsman. The intelligent hound learns from experience and seldom wastes time repeating mistakes. Intelligence is indicated by ability to adapt to changes in scenting conditions, to adapt and to control its work with various types of running mates, and to apply sound working principles toward accomplishing the most under a variety of circumstances.


The hound that displays the aforementioned qualities would be considered the Ideal Beagle for all purposes afield, capable of serving as a field trial hound, a gun dog or a member of a pack, on either rabbit or hare.


5-C Definitions—29Faulty Actions​


Quitting is a serious fault deserving severe penalty and, in its extreme form, elimination. Quitting indicates lack of desire to hunt and succeed. It ranges from refusing to run, to such lesser forms as lack of perseverance, occasional letup of eagerness, and loafing or watching other hounds in difficult situations. Quitting is sometimes due to fatigue. Judges may temper their distaste when a hound becomes fatigued and eases off, if such a hound has been required to perform substantially longer than those with which it is running. During the running of a class, a hound may have to face several fresh competitors in succession. In such instances, a short rest period would be in order. Otherwise, Judges should expect hounds to be in condition to compete as long as necessary to prove their worthiness, and no hound that becomes unable to go on should place over any immediate running mate that is still able and willing to run.


Backtracking is the fault of following the trail in the wrong direction. If persisted in for any substantial time or distance it deserves elimination. However, hounds in competition sometimes take a backline momentarily, or are led into it by faulty running mates. Under these circumstances, Judges should show leniency toward the hound that becomes aware of its mistakes and makes a creditable correction. Judges should be very certain before penalizing a hound for backtracking and, if there is any doubt, take sufficient time to prove it to be either right or wrong. Backtracking indicates lack of ability to determine direction of game travel.


Ghost trailing is pretending to have contact with a trail and making progress where no trail exists, by going through all the actions that indicate true trailing. Some hounds are able to do this in a very convincing manner and Judges, if suspicious, should make the hound prove its claim.


Pottering is lack of effort or desire to make forward progress on the trail. Hesitating, listlessness, dawdling or lack of intent to make progress are marks of the potterer.


Babbling is excessive or unnecessary tonguing. The babbler often tongues the same trail over and over, or tongues from excitement when casting in attempting to regain the trail at losses.


Swinging is casting out too far and too soon from the last point of contact, without first making an attempt to regain scent near the loss. It is a gambling action, quite often indicating over-competitiveness or an attempt to gain unearned advantage over running mates.


Skirting is purposely leaving the trail in an attempt to gain a lead or avoid hazardous cover or hard work. It is cutting out and around true trailing mates in an attempt to intercept the trail ahead.


Leaving checks is failure to stay in the vicinity of a loss and attempt to work it out, bounding off in hopes of encountering the trail or new game. Leaving checks denotes lack of patience and perseverance.


Running mute is failure to give tongue when making progress on the line.


Tightness of mouth is a failure to give sufficient tongue when making progress. This will often be evidenced by the hound tightening up when pressed or when going away from a check.


Racing is attempting to outfoot running mates without regard for the trail. Racing hounds overshoot the turns and generally spend more time off the trail than on it.


Running hit or miss is attempting to make progress without maintaining continuous contact with the trail, or gambling to hit the trail ahead.


Lack of independence is a common fault that is shown by watching other hounds and allowing them to determine the course of action. Any action which indicates undue concern for other hounds, except when harking in, is cause for demerit.


Bounding off is rushing ahead when contact with scent is made, without properly determining direction of game travel.

5-D Credits

(1) Hounds shall be credited principally for their positive accomplishments. The extent of any credit should be governed by the magnitude of the accomplishment and the manner in which it is achieved. Credit is earned for searching ability, pursuing ability, accuracy in trailing, proper use of voice, endurance, adaptability, patience, determination, proper degree of independence, cooperation, controlled competitive spirit, intelligence displayed when searching or in solving problems encountered along the trail and success in accounting for game.

(2) When crediting hounds for working style or methods used to gain accomplishments, Judges should keep the purpose of the breed constantly in mind and be alert for hounds, deficient in ability, that make simple problems appear difficult. They also should guard against becoming impressed by fascinating actions that do not produce results. Credit for working style should be used chiefly to differentiate between successful performers, and should never be applied to a degree which might indicate that style or method has been preferred to accomplishment, except in instances where excessive faultiness is involved. Credit for any accomplishment should be in proportion to its contribution to the performance. Mere lack of fault is not grounds for credit. While faultiness is not to be considered lightly, the slightly faulty hound that succeeds should be preferred to the stylist that fails.

5-E Demerits

(1) Faults, mistakes, lack of accomplishment and apparent lack of intelligence shall be considered demerits and shall be penalized to whatever extent they interfere with or fail to contribute to a performance.
(2) Faults are undesirable traits indicating lack of sound quality, and shall be penalized in proportion to the degree of commitment, the frequency of repetition, and the distractions they afford running mates, as well as for the interruptions or lack of progress they cause during the performance. Quitting, backtracking, ghost trailing and running mute are the more serious faults. Pottering, swinging, skirting, babbling, leaving checks, racing, running in hit-or-miss fashion, tightness of mouth and lack of desire or ability to find and move game shall be considered demerits.

(3) Mistakes are erratic judgments, sometimes committed under pressure of competition and prompted by a desire to excel and sometimes due to influence of faulty running mates. Where mistakes are not committed with a frequency that would indicate lack of sound quality, consideration should be shown according to the hound’s aptitude for realizing its errors, and its efforts to overcome them.

(4) Lack of accomplishment is failure to get enough done to compare favorably with the competition, and is often due to lack of such qualities as determination, patience, intelligence or endurance. In instances where this is apparent, the penalty should be severe. Judgment on hounds that fail to accomplish as desired should be based on the circumstances under which the failure occurred and the determination and intelligence displayed in the effort to overcome it. Where failure is no fault of the hound, such as interference with the game or trail, or where a worthy hound encounters an especially hazardous or abnormal circumstance unlike anything the majority of contestants are expected to overcome, new game should be provided without penalty. Lack of intelligence is apparent in the hound that does not portray sound judgment and skill during its performance.


PROCEDURE 7. INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES​


7-A Whenever practicable, the hounds shall be cast to search for game, but the decision as to whether the hounds are to be cast or whether they are to be kept on leash until they are laid on a line where game has been sighted, shall be made by the Judges alone.


Note: At a brace/trio trial, for the first series the hounds shall be laid on the line in order drawn unless all handlers involved in the brace/trio agree to a different order. For second and subsequent series, the hounds shall be laid on the line in the order called back.


7-B Each heat shall be conducted in a manner best calculated to give the competitors equal opportunity to display the qualities under judgment. No hound shall be started except as part of a complete brace or trio at the start of a brace or trio in first series, or without a bracemate at the start of a brace in second and subsequent series. The Judges shall establish a reasonable time before dropping a hound that is missing after the start of a brace or trio. The hound or hounds called to complete a brace or trio in any series shall be under judgment. Any previous scoring received by such additional hound or hounds shall be cancelled, unless previously defeated.


When running a brace in any series, if a hound attacks its bracemate in a manner which, in the opinion of the Judges, renders it impossible for the non-offending hound to perform properly, the Judges shall order up the offender and run the non-offending hound until they are satisfied, calling for an additional rabbit or rabbits if required.


If at the start of a brace or trio, one or two of the hounds refuse to run, or if at any time before the completion of the judging of a brace or trio, one or two of the hounds become lost or quit, the Judges shall continue to run the remaining hound or hounds until they are satisfied, calling for an additional rabbit or rabbits if required.


When the hounds are running in trios, the Judges must order out of the trio any one hound (but not more than one) which in their opinion is found to disorganize the smooth running of the trio.


A Marshal may be appointed by the Field Trial Committee to accompany the Judges to assist them in picking up any hound that has been ordered out of the trio.


7-C When a hound gives signs of being on game, the Judges shall allow it opportunity to prove whether or not it is on true trail. Judges shall not penalize or fault a hound without ample proof. If reasonable doubt exists, the hound shall be given the benefit of the doubt.


7-D When the hounds have been laid on a line together or have been given an opportunity to hark in to one another in any series, this shall be considered


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as competition, except that when no hound opens, the brace or trio shall be given a second rabbit or hare unless the first rabbit or hare was seen by one of the Judges.


7-E Trailing game other than announced, such as pheasants or game animals, shall not be considered a demerit.


7-F Should a brace or trio become divided, the hounds going away on different rabbits or hares, the Judges shall order all hounds up and the brace or trio shall be put on game different from that previously run by any of the hounds.


7-G Judges shall demerit, but not eliminate, a hound in any series for the sole reason of losing game.


7-H When additional game is required, the search shall start at the point where the last game was found.


7-I After the running of first series has been completed, the Judges shall announce which hounds they wish to see in second series and no other hounds shall be called to run in second series following this announcement except in the case of an error by the Judges in identification of a hound, and except further that the Judges may call for an additional hound to replace any hound that has been measured out at second series or is absent for second series measuring. A club must advertise that at an event, second and subsequent series may be run in accord with the Procedures for Small Pack trials, but otherwise, second and subsequent series shall be run in Braces. In bracing the hounds in second series, the hound having the highest score from first series must be announced as the first hound in the first brace, and its bracemate shall be the next highest scored hound which has not been braced with it in first series. The remaining braces in second series and all braces in subsequent series shall be braced in the same manner. No two hounds shall be braced together if they have run in the same brace or trio in an earlier series.


7-J All hounds called for second series shall be considered as having an opportunity to win or place regardless of their relative positions when called back, except that no hound shall be placed higher than another placed hound by which it has previously been defeated in direct competition during the running of the class. In deciding whether one hound has defeated another in direct competition in second or subsequent series, the scoring of the two hounds in earlier series shall not be considered. After first series, the Judges shall run each brace until one hound in their opinion has clearly defeated the other, unless both hounds are so faulty as not to merit further consideration for placement. If required, additional rabbits may be given at the Judges’ discretion.


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7-K The Judges may announce the four placed hounds at any time after completion of second series, provided each placed hound has been defeated in direct competitor by the hound placed immediately above it. All placed hounds must have run in second series. No series, nor any part of any series, shall be rerun except for any part of a series which may have been affected by an error made by the Judges in bracing or in identification of a hound, and except further that the Judges may continue the running of a brace at a later time or on the following day if darkness or severe weather conditions make it necessary to pick up the hounds before the judging of that brace is completed.


7-L The Judges must agree on the scoring of each hound before starting the next brace or trio.


7-M Should there arise at any time during the running of a heat a question concerning the actual running of the hounds that is not provided for in these Procedures, the Judges shall handle the situation in a manner not contrary to these Procedures, and shall so decide the matter as to give each hound an equal opportunity.


7-N No owner or handler shall have any right to question or refuse to follow the Judges’ orders


7-O Handlers, while their hounds are down, shall go together and keep within sight of the Judges and each other when possible. When hounds are cast, a handler may speak or whistle to his hound or work it any way he may deem proper, if not contrary to these Procedures, but he shall not make any unnecessary noise, nor interfere with an opponent’s hound in any way. When hounds have been laid on a line together or have harked in to one another, the duties of the handlers shall cease until further instructed by the Judges. The handlers shall at all times keep back of the Judges and hounds unless otherwise instructed by the Judges. Judges shall enforce these requirements at all times.
Great post Mitch. Although I do think constructive criticism can be valuable. Problems are only solved thru actions. Field trials and Beagle clubs are in dire need of active club members and Qualified judges. I can guarantee you one thing, your perspective changes when you following a pack of dogs with a pencil and scorecard in you hand.
 

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With todays technology we could pretty much eliminate human perception. But it would cost a bundle and there would be allot of disappointed people. There is quite a difference in how different judges interpret the rules. The biggest differences that I have seen where the differences between pickup faults and demerits. Example, allot of judges will not tolerate a extra bark, but will demerit lack of hunt. According to the rules, they are both demerits. It all boils down to what a particular judge likes or dislikes. That is why they have two judges too try to avoid personal opinions. But even certain regions take on likes or dislikes according to what the masses have been saying in there particular area. All I can say dont take trialing to serious, its just a game that we play with our beagles. Who knows, if you end up attending a trial and get pick along with another person at the same time and then go run the rest of the day somewhere else with your rejects you might make a friend.
 

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To me this is the correct way to answer any questions anyone has on judging. This is what the AKC has to say about Judging ACK Filed trials.

As hounds men and women do yourselves a favor and take a moment and read every line on this posted entry below.

Lastly if you care enough about field trials to complain I strongly suggest you count the costs, remove all excuses from you lips, do the hard work of getting in physical shape (NO MATTER YOU AGE) study for the judges test and go take it. Call all the clubs in you area and tell them you want to judge and make a positive difference.

Be part of the solution...… Not part of the problem...… Don't tell us...SHOW US!

Thank you


PROCEDURE 5. STANDARD FOR JUDGING5-A FOREWORD​


(1) The Beagle is a trailing hound whose purpose is to find game, to pursue it in an energetic and decisive manner, and to show a determination to account for it.


(2) All phases of its work should be approached eagerly, with a display of determination that indicates willingness to stay with any problem encountered until successful. Actions should appear deliberate and efficient, rather than haphazard or impulsive.


(3) To perform as desired, the Beagle must be endowed with a keen nose, a sound body, and an intelligent mind, and must have an intense enthusiasm for hunting.


(4) Beagle Field Trials are designed and conducted for the purpose of selecting those hounds that display sound quality and ability to the best advantage.


(5) This Standard of Performance contains descriptions of both desirable and faulty actions. Judges will use it as a guide in evaluating performances, and will credit or demerit performance to whatever degree their actions indicate quality or fault, and to the extent that these actions contribute to accomplishment, fail to contribute to accomplishment, or interfere with accomplishment.


(6) Judges should approach their work with the attitude that the future welfare of the breed is in their hands, and should make their findings and selections on a basis calculated toward keeping the Beagle useful for both field trials and hunting purposes.


5-B Definitions—Desirable Qualities​


Searching ability is evidenced by an aptitude to recognize promising cover and eagerness to explore it, regardless of hazards or discomfort. Hounds should search independently of each other, in an industrious manner, with sufficient range. In trials run under Brace or Small Pack Procedures, hounds should remain within control distance of the handler, and should be obedient to his commands.


Pursuing ability is shown by a proficiency for keeping control of the trail while making the best possible progress. Game should be pursued rather than merely followed, and actions should indicate a determined effort to make forward progress in the surest, most sensible manner by adjusting speed to correspond to conditions and circumstances. Actions should be positive and controlled, portraying sound judgment and skill. Progress should be proclaimed by tonguing. No hound can be too fast, provided the trail is clearly and accurately followed. At a check, hounds should work industriously, first close to where the loss occurred, then gradually and thoroughly extending the search further afield to regain the line.


Accuracy in trailing is the ability to keep consistent control of the trail while making the best possible progress. An accurate trailing hound will show a marked tendency to follow the trail with a minimum of weaving on and off, and will display an aptness to turn with the trail and to determine direction of game travel in a positive manner.


Proper use of voice is proclaiming all finds and denoting all forward progress by giving tongue, yet keeping silent when not in contact with scent that can be progressed. True tongue is honest claiming that running mates can depend on.


Endurance is the ability to compete throughout the duration of the hunt and to go on as long as may be necessary.


Adaptability means being able to adjust quickly to changes in scenting conditions and being able to work harmoniously with a variety of running mates. An adaptable hound will pursue its quarry as fast as conditions permit or as slowly as conditions demand. At a loss, it will first work close, and then, if necessary, move out gradually to recover the line.


Patience is a willingness to stay with any problem encountered as long as there is a possibility of achieving success in a workmanlike manner, rather than taking a chance of making the recovery more quickly through guesswork or gambling. Patience keeps a hound from bounding off and leaving work undone, and causes it to apply itself to the surest and safest methods in difficult situations.


Determination is that quality which causes a hound to succeed against severe odds. A determined hound has a purpose in mind and will overcome, through sheer perseverance, many obstacles that often frustrate less determined running mates. Determination and patience are closely related qualities and are generally found in the same hound. Determination keeps a hound at its work as long as there is a possibility of achievement and quite often long after its body has passed the peak of its endurance. Determination is desire in its most intense form.


Independence is the ability to be self-reliant and to refrain from becoming upset or influenced by the actions of faulty hounds. The proper degree of independence is displayed by the hound that concentrates on running its game with no undue concern for its running mates except to hark to them when they proclaim a find or indicate progress by tonguing. Tailing, or watching other hounds, is indication of lack of sufficient independence. Ignoring other hounds completely and refusing to hark to or move up with running mates is indication of too much independence.


Cooperation is the ability to work harmoniously with other hounds by doing as much of the work as possible in an honest, efficient manner, yet being aware of and honoring the accomplishments of running mates without jealousy or disruption of the chase.


Competitive spirit is the desire to outdo running mates. It is a borderline quality that is an asset only to the hound that is able to keep it under control and to concentrate on running the game rather than on beating other hounds. The overly competitive hound lacks such qualities as adaptability, patience, independence and cooperation, and in its desire to excel is seldom accurate.


Intelligence is that quality which influences a hound to apply its talents efficiently, in the manner of a skilled craftsman. The intelligent hound learns from experience and seldom wastes time repeating mistakes. Intelligence is indicated by ability to adapt to changes in scenting conditions, to adapt and to control its work with various types of running mates, and to apply sound working principles toward accomplishing the most under a variety of circumstances.


The hound that displays the aforementioned qualities would be considered the Ideal Beagle for all purposes afield, capable of serving as a field trial hound, a gun dog or a member of a pack, on either rabbit or hare.


5-C Definitions—29Faulty Actions​


Quitting is a serious fault deserving severe penalty and, in its extreme form, elimination. Quitting indicates lack of desire to hunt and succeed. It ranges from refusing to run, to such lesser forms as lack of perseverance, occasional letup of eagerness, and loafing or watching other hounds in difficult situations. Quitting is sometimes due to fatigue. Judges may temper their distaste when a hound becomes fatigued and eases off, if such a hound has been required to perform substantially longer than those with which it is running. During the running of a class, a hound may have to face several fresh competitors in succession. In such instances, a short rest period would be in order. Otherwise, Judges should expect hounds to be in condition to compete as long as necessary to prove their worthiness, and no hound that becomes unable to go on should place over any immediate running mate that is still able and willing to run.


Backtracking is the fault of following the trail in the wrong direction. If persisted in for any substantial time or distance it deserves elimination. However, hounds in competition sometimes take a backline momentarily, or are led into it by faulty running mates. Under these circumstances, Judges should show leniency toward the hound that becomes aware of its mistakes and makes a creditable correction. Judges should be very certain before penalizing a hound for backtracking and, if there is any doubt, take sufficient time to prove it to be either right or wrong. Backtracking indicates lack of ability to determine direction of game travel.


Ghost trailing is pretending to have contact with a trail and making progress where no trail exists, by going through all the actions that indicate true trailing. Some hounds are able to do this in a very convincing manner and Judges, if suspicious, should make the hound prove its claim.


Pottering is lack of effort or desire to make forward progress on the trail. Hesitating, listlessness, dawdling or lack of intent to make progress are marks of the potterer.


Babbling is excessive or unnecessary tonguing. The babbler often tongues the same trail over and over, or tongues from excitement when casting in attempting to regain the trail at losses.


Swinging is casting out too far and too soon from the last point of contact, without first making an attempt to regain scent near the loss. It is a gambling action, quite often indicating over-competitiveness or an attempt to gain unearned advantage over running mates.


Skirting is purposely leaving the trail in an attempt to gain a lead or avoid hazardous cover or hard work. It is cutting out and around true trailing mates in an attempt to intercept the trail ahead.


Leaving checks is failure to stay in the vicinity of a loss and attempt to work it out, bounding off in hopes of encountering the trail or new game. Leaving checks denotes lack of patience and perseverance.


Running mute is failure to give tongue when making progress on the line.


Tightness of mouth is a failure to give sufficient tongue when making progress. This will often be evidenced by the hound tightening up when pressed or when going away from a check.


Racing is attempting to outfoot running mates without regard for the trail. Racing hounds overshoot the turns and generally spend more time off the trail than on it.


Running hit or miss is attempting to make progress without maintaining continuous contact with the trail, or gambling to hit the trail ahead.


Lack of independence is a common fault that is shown by watching other hounds and allowing them to determine the course of action. Any action which indicates undue concern for other hounds, except when harking in, is cause for demerit.


Bounding off is rushing ahead when contact with scent is made, without properly determining direction of game travel.

5-D Credits

(1) Hounds shall be credited principally for their positive accomplishments. The extent of any credit should be governed by the magnitude of the accomplishment and the manner in which it is achieved. Credit is earned for searching ability, pursuing ability, accuracy in trailing, proper use of voice, endurance, adaptability, patience, determination, proper degree of independence, cooperation, controlled competitive spirit, intelligence displayed when searching or in solving problems encountered along the trail and success in accounting for game.

(2) When crediting hounds for working style or methods used to gain accomplishments, Judges should keep the purpose of the breed constantly in mind and be alert for hounds, deficient in ability, that make simple problems appear difficult. They also should guard against becoming impressed by fascinating actions that do not produce results. Credit for working style should be used chiefly to differentiate between successful performers, and should never be applied to a degree which might indicate that style or method has been preferred to accomplishment, except in instances where excessive faultiness is involved. Credit for any accomplishment should be in proportion to its contribution to the performance. Mere lack of fault is not grounds for credit. While faultiness is not to be considered lightly, the slightly faulty hound that succeeds should be preferred to the stylist that fails.

5-E Demerits

(1) Faults, mistakes, lack of accomplishment and apparent lack of intelligence shall be considered demerits and shall be penalized to whatever extent they interfere with or fail to contribute to a performance.
(2) Faults are undesirable traits indicating lack of sound quality, and shall be penalized in proportion to the degree of commitment, the frequency of repetition, and the distractions they afford running mates, as well as for the interruptions or lack of progress they cause during the performance. Quitting, backtracking, ghost trailing and running mute are the more serious faults. Pottering, swinging, skirting, babbling, leaving checks, racing, running in hit-or-miss fashion, tightness of mouth and lack of desire or ability to find and move game shall be considered demerits.

(3) Mistakes are erratic judgments, sometimes committed under pressure of competition and prompted by a desire to excel and sometimes due to influence of faulty running mates. Where mistakes are not committed with a frequency that would indicate lack of sound quality, consideration should be shown according to the hound’s aptitude for realizing its errors, and its efforts to overcome them.

(4) Lack of accomplishment is failure to get enough done to compare favorably with the competition, and is often due to lack of such qualities as determination, patience, intelligence or endurance. In instances where this is apparent, the penalty should be severe. Judgment on hounds that fail to accomplish as desired should be based on the circumstances under which the failure occurred and the determination and intelligence displayed in the effort to overcome it. Where failure is no fault of the hound, such as interference with the game or trail, or where a worthy hound encounters an especially hazardous or abnormal circumstance unlike anything the majority of contestants are expected to overcome, new game should be provided without penalty. Lack of intelligence is apparent in the hound that does not portray sound judgment and skill during its performance.


PROCEDURE 7. INSTRUCTIONS TO JUDGES​


7-A Whenever practicable, the hounds shall be cast to search for game, but the decision as to whether the hounds are to be cast or whether they are to be kept on leash until they are laid on a line where game has been sighted, shall be made by the Judges alone.


Note: At a brace/trio trial, for the first series the hounds shall be laid on the line in order drawn unless all handlers involved in the brace/trio agree to a different order. For second and subsequent series, the hounds shall be laid on the line in the order called back.


7-B Each heat shall be conducted in a manner best calculated to give the competitors equal opportunity to display the qualities under judgment. No hound shall be started except as part of a complete brace or trio at the start of a brace or trio in first series, or without a bracemate at the start of a brace in second and subsequent series. The Judges shall establish a reasonable time before dropping a hound that is missing after the start of a brace or trio. The hound or hounds called to complete a brace or trio in any series shall be under judgment. Any previous scoring received by such additional hound or hounds shall be cancelled, unless previously defeated.


When running a brace in any series, if a hound attacks its bracemate in a manner which, in the opinion of the Judges, renders it impossible for the non-offending hound to perform properly, the Judges shall order up the offender and run the non-offending hound until they are satisfied, calling for an additional rabbit or rabbits if required.


If at the start of a brace or trio, one or two of the hounds refuse to run, or if at any time before the completion of the judging of a brace or trio, one or two of the hounds become lost or quit, the Judges shall continue to run the remaining hound or hounds until they are satisfied, calling for an additional rabbit or rabbits if required.


When the hounds are running in trios, the Judges must order out of the trio any one hound (but not more than one) which in their opinion is found to disorganize the smooth running of the trio.


A Marshal may be appointed by the Field Trial Committee to accompany the Judges to assist them in picking up any hound that has been ordered out of the trio.


7-C When a hound gives signs of being on game, the Judges shall allow it opportunity to prove whether or not it is on true trail. Judges shall not penalize or fault a hound without ample proof. If reasonable doubt exists, the hound shall be given the benefit of the doubt.


7-D When the hounds have been laid on a line together or have been given an opportunity to hark in to one another in any series, this shall be considered


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as competition, except that when no hound opens, the brace or trio shall be given a second rabbit or hare unless the first rabbit or hare was seen by one of the Judges.


7-E Trailing game other than announced, such as pheasants or game animals, shall not be considered a demerit.


7-F Should a brace or trio become divided, the hounds going away on different rabbits or hares, the Judges shall order all hounds up and the brace or trio shall be put on game different from that previously run by any of the hounds.


7-G Judges shall demerit, but not eliminate, a hound in any series for the sole reason of losing game.


7-H When additional game is required, the search shall start at the point where the last game was found.


7-I After the running of first series has been completed, the Judges shall announce which hounds they wish to see in second series and no other hounds shall be called to run in second series following this announcement except in the case of an error by the Judges in identification of a hound, and except further that the Judges may call for an additional hound to replace any hound that has been measured out at second series or is absent for second series measuring. A club must advertise that at an event, second and subsequent series may be run in accord with the Procedures for Small Pack trials, but otherwise, second and subsequent series shall be run in Braces. In bracing the hounds in second series, the hound having the highest score from first series must be announced as the first hound in the first brace, and its bracemate shall be the next highest scored hound which has not been braced with it in first series. The remaining braces in second series and all braces in subsequent series shall be braced in the same manner. No two hounds shall be braced together if they have run in the same brace or trio in an earlier series.


7-J All hounds called for second series shall be considered as having an opportunity to win or place regardless of their relative positions when called back, except that no hound shall be placed higher than another placed hound by which it has previously been defeated in direct competition during the running of the class. In deciding whether one hound has defeated another in direct competition in second or subsequent series, the scoring of the two hounds in earlier series shall not be considered. After first series, the Judges shall run each brace until one hound in their opinion has clearly defeated the other, unless both hounds are so faulty as not to merit further consideration for placement. If required, additional rabbits may be given at the Judges’ discretion.


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7-K The Judges may announce the four placed hounds at any time after completion of second series, provided each placed hound has been defeated in direct competitor by the hound placed immediately above it. All placed hounds must have run in second series. No series, nor any part of any series, shall be rerun except for any part of a series which may have been affected by an error made by the Judges in bracing or in identification of a hound, and except further that the Judges may continue the running of a brace at a later time or on the following day if darkness or severe weather conditions make it necessary to pick up the hounds before the judging of that brace is completed.


7-L The Judges must agree on the scoring of each hound before starting the next brace or trio.


7-M Should there arise at any time during the running of a heat a question concerning the actual running of the hounds that is not provided for in these Procedures, the Judges shall handle the situation in a manner not contrary to these Procedures, and shall so decide the matter as to give each hound an equal opportunity.


7-N No owner or handler shall have any right to question or refuse to follow the Judges’ orders


7-O Handlers, while their hounds are down, shall go together and keep within sight of the Judges and each other when possible. When hounds are cast, a handler may speak or whistle to his hound or work it any way he may deem proper, if not contrary to these Procedures, but he shall not make any unnecessary noise, nor interfere with an opponent’s hound in any way. When hounds have been laid on a line together or have harked in to one another, the duties of the handlers shall cease until further instructed by the Judges. The handlers shall at all times keep back of the Judges and hounds unless otherwise instructed by the Judges. Judges shall enforce these requirements at all times.
I’ve always loved rabbit hunting and the past twenty years attending trials when somewhat convenient. Just like many things in life you and I see, I said I would like to do that. Instead of just saying it I did it. Attended an AKC judging seminar and judged my first trial at the tender age of 66. Don’t know how well I did but on the good side the dog I had high after first series prevailed and won. On the bad side I only made one person mad. I felt sure I would have angered more people. If you don’t judge or have never judged you’re sounding a lot like congress. Quick to say what someone ELSE should do just as long as you’re not inconvenienced. You can do it. Just follow a few packs around and try to see it all with sweat in your eyes your legs are cramping and hoping to get another breath before your lungs explode. If you can’t judge SPO judge TCP. Just try it. GET ON UP!
 

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5 Solas sounds like you had a great time. That is what interests me. Going to see what others have as far as dogs, what ideas others have, what i can learn from thm or share with them. In the end it would just be me seeing how my hunting dogs stack up against what others have. Go home with a smile on my face.

Mitch I agree that I would need to know rules before I go
 

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BODY CAM ON JUDGES~ that will record the dogs----it will encourage judges to keep up----not just meander along---and questions go back to video and address the problem. body cams start around 350.00 and your club needs 4-----
 

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@Jimlerminez, if your intent is to go and meet great people and have fun, I think you should 100% get in to trials. I love trials, I have so much fun at them, I have met some awesome people at them, and I never win, haha. Don't get me wrong, it is much more fun to show up with hounds that are competitive, but even just being at them is a great time!

Here was how my weekend went at the trial:

I went to Grand Lake Beagle Club this weekend to run in the Stoney Creek Gundog Brace trial. I took two bitches, one big and one little. I showed up about 7:30, got my hounds entered, and got a plate of Biscuits and Gravy with sausage and eggs. (I will never miss another trial at Grand Lake, because I eat so good there, it rivals cracker barrel. Every single time!) I grabbed my plate and went over and set down with some old timers that I only see at trials. They are from all over the midwestern states, and some from farther down like TN. We sat there for a half hour or so, talked about our best hounds, talked about our up-and-comers, talked about funny things that their grandkids did, told jokes, maybe ribbed on each other a little bit, and enjoyed our breakfast. Then we drew out for braces. My little bitch drew out in the first trio in her class. My big bitch drew out in the 4th in hers. (I posted a video called "Judge this Pack..." last week. The yellow collared black dog, Five Solas Mustang Sally, that everybody either liked or hated was the little one I am talking about. The 11 month old lemon dog, Lou, was the big one.)

Mustang Sally is a wild-card. She has the desire and fire, but when I got her she was super-shy. Sometimes she slips back into that shyness. Sometimes she looks like a field champion, and sometimes she freaks out around all the people. I couldn't wait to see which Mustang Sally showed up... Was she going to be Pinto Sally or Shelby GT350 Sally?

Well, we cast the first little trio. She stood there and looked at me... Crap, it was Pinto Sally. A rabbit flushes. The other two hounds go. Sally eventually does. The rabbit makes 6 turns in the first 100 yards. Sally gets hung out to dry 6 times straight. My buddy Jeff was judging. "Pick up white!" I started cracking up. I looked at him and said, "Yep. Easiest decision you will make all day." I was happy he let her try 6 times, it just wasn't her day. I better get up front and get my big yellow derby bitch ready.

I put Sally up, collar Lou, and head to the pen. They were only on the second trio, so I had two to go. I walked out with this fella that I had met before at these trials, but I couldn't remember his name. We had a very nice chat while we walked out. We talked about my derby, what she was great at and what she was missing. He told me a story about a hound he had that was in the same situation. He told me what he did to help it along, and what he wishes he would have done. We moseyed on back to where the group was and sat down on a bench. I couldn't hardly keep this dog on the leash. She heard hounds running a rabbit, she saw brush piles, she could smell the fresh morning air... We were here to run and she didn't want to wait any longer. I could tell I'm not going to have the same problem I had with Sally!

I saw my buddy Wayne who sold me this lemon hound as a puppy...

"Mr Smith, where did you get that ugly thing?"
I replied, "Tipton County Humane Society!"
"What kind of dog is that?" Wayne asks.
"Some kind of beagle-mix I think. Maybe part pit, most of them up there are!"
"Well I hope you didn't pay too much for it!"
"I only paid the $40 donation," I said. "But I had to promise to get her spayed."
"Sounds like you paid too much to me!"

We are both cracking up at this point. We sat down on a bench with a group of other guys. Teased each other about how cheap we all are. How bad their memories are getting. How much I am paying the judges under the table to give me an NBQ. Then the conversation got a little more serious, as I picked Wayne's brain about what he is breeding to, and what he is getting out of some of the studs I was considering. Does he think his kennel is getting too slow or too loose? Where is he going next with it?

My lemon bitch was cast with one of my good buddy Jerry's hounds and another guy I hadn't met before. Jerry was over in the little class so a buddy of ours was handling her. Jerry has been saying to me, "I really want you to see this hound." He mostly runs little but this girl was big. I was wondering if he wanted me to see her as in, "I think you might want to buy her. "

We cast the dogs. Something was wrong with Jerry's dog... She wouldn't go. She seemed really timid too. I think she was experiencing what my little bitch did in the other class. We couldn't get her to go. I picked her up and took her up with the other two, but she wouldn't go. The judges finally said "if she doesn't go this time, handle her." She wouldn't go. Darn, I was really wanting to see her. She must have been sick or something.


Now the other two hounds.... they were on fire! Man you should have seen this lemon dog of mine! She was much younger than the hound she was running against, and this was only her second all-age trial. She was getting beat. I could just tell. But she sure enough looked like she belonged there! She looked like she wanted to win, and like she had the natural ability to win! She got a few licks in of her own! I was so proud when she picked up a few of those checks. She did something I know the judges saw though. Every once in a while, she would stop and pick her head up and look over at her brace mate to see if she was getting it. I know I had more nose than that other dog, but I just need this dog to get her confidence up. She needs soloed. A little more experience, and she will be putting on a show here. They let this brace run for about 15 minutes, just to make sure. They handle them and score my bracemate. I went back to the truck all smiles because I know that by the Stoney Creek Gundog Brace trial next year, Lou will be a force to reckon with! I headed back to the truck to put my dogs up. Went in and got lunch... brats and burgers! I sat around and talked to some of my buddies from out of state for a while. I talked to Jerry about his hound. He said he was surprised and that she must not be feeling too well. He thought he did well in the little class though.

The little class was heading back out for winner series. I decided I was going to stick around to see how it went. Jerry came back 2nd in the little class! I went out with him. The top two dogs were cast. He was sure hoping she could flip it. We watched the high hounds run for about 15 minutes. It was neck and neck! I thought his hound looked like she really flipped it. So did the marshal we were standing next to. The two hounds on the ground were a little different. Jerry's hound was tighter and left nothing out. The other hound stretched out a little farther and was a little tighter with her mouth. Do the judges think Jerry's hound is mouthy in the check, or do they think the other dog is letting her do all the work and cutting her off? A man could honestly see it either way. Did they think they saw enough to flip it? I don't know. I thought I did, but I know I am biased. I was really pulling for her.

They hit a final check. It is a good time to catch them. "Okay handle them, guys!" I am about 40 years younger than the two handlers, so I always try to catch hounds for people. Well right as I move in on them, Jerry's hound picks it up and these two take off across the field on the hot trail like the Kentucky Derby that was going on on the other channel! They ran this trail the length of the back field, then it takes a hard turn... Neither hound oversteps it, they just grab it and sprint back in to the brush. My FitBit starts buzzing because I hit 10,000 steps for the day. I think a few thousand of them were running these two down. (It's a good thin g too, because I need to walk those biscuits and gravy off!) They finally hit a check and I was able to grab both of them. The handlers got to me before I could get them in my truck and get back to Tipton County unnoticed....

What a brace! I thought to myself, "man, the rabbits I could kill over these two! The judges did great, these are definitely the two best hounds out here!" Unfortunately, they didn't flip. Jerry was very happy to have gotten a 2nd! And to know she was that close, she will get them next time. What a hound!

I tell you what, I am going to go back and solo the heck out of this lemon dog. The next time they see me, they better watch out. This lemon dog is going to be a force to reckon with! She has so much raw talent, I just have to get it out of her! I owe her that much!

This little black dog needs the same treatment. She may be up for sale before too long if she can't snap out of fraidy-cat mode at the trials. Maybe I need to head out to Jerry's and run these two with his big bitch. Maybe they all three need to be around more strange dogs. Maybe his girl just had a belly-ache that day and I would really like her otherwise. One way to find out...

I want to thank Grand Lake for putting on an awesome trial! @BigK is the man, and always runs a great show. He works hard at it and it shows! He is making our sport better.
I was at a trail 2 years ago with dad and a friend old friend.We had two males one 13 inch class and one and a 15 inch class.Great morning cold frosty sun come up started getting warm.Only First time at trail near a few of the kennels running up there had a male hound that was bread and out of one of those.I believe one or two of the houseman on him once when he was very young when we got drawled up one across the road to the field they said cast hounds.. unleash the hounds mine took a dump as they entered the edge a ticket by the road .He opened up and started working forward the other hounds was scattered around close..They took off the judge said Handle white.So I did it was my hound never understood how they could say handle your hound in less three minutes being turned loose..Lotta great people and And house means..Nothing to say just went out of curiosity for my dad and Fran is interested in going it happened to be like qualifying for deep south or sometime just been puzzled from that..
 

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Judges wearing cameras won't work except in theory. Great idea but not realistic. If someone thinks their dog got wronged they'll want to take it to instant replay for lack of a better term. When is that to be done? Immediately after a dog is picked up? After the pack from that series is handled? After the series as a whole is over? So the trial will have to stop, people gather back at the club house, review the footage discuss what happened, make a change if need be then back to the field. It won't just be highly questionable decisions that are reviewed EVERYONE will think they have a right to see it from the judges camera after their dog is picked up. Shoot, I can hear it now "Well if HE got a review then I deserve one too!"

How good is the footage going to be? Is the camera strapped to the judges chest? Hat? I bet when you go back to review footage you will be looking at some seriously shaky video of a judge running through briars and brush not REALLY seeing it all. It might could work on a brace or trio but I don't see it happening in SPO with a big pack.
 

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Judges wearing cameras won't work except in theory. Great idea but not realistic. If someone thinks their dog got wronged they'll want to take it to instant replay for lack of a better term. When is that to be done? Immediately after a dog is picked up? After the pack from that series is handled? After the series as a whole is over? So the trial will have to stop, people gather back at the club house, review the footage discuss what happened, make a change if need be then back to the field. It won't just be highly questionable decisions that are reviewed EVERYONE will think they have a right to see it from the judges camera after their dog is picked up. Shoot, I can hear it now "Well if HE got a review then I deserve one too!"

How good is the footage going to be? Is the camera strapped to the judges chest? Hat? I bet when you go back to review footage you will be looking at some seriously shaky video of a judge running through briars and brush not REALLY seeing it all. It might could work on a brace or trio but I don't see it happening in SPO with a big pack.
after the trial--question it thru field trial committee---if judge is wrong keep records---if he is wrong pretty often he is either crooked or dont know what he is doing----once that has been determined the problem can be addressed-----cameras were used in bird dog trials and worked great
IF you question the calls of the judges it will cost you 25.00 if you are wrong you loose the money ---if you right you get the money back
 

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When I was judging, there was nothing worse than judging with another guy who could not keep up enough to make a decision. Many times we had to run longer so the other guy could finally see enough, even after being down an hour or more. I don’t think some judges will ever see enough, even if you did strap a camera to them. Judges need to be in running condition just like the hounds, especially as the hounds are getting faster.
 

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When I was judging, there was nothing worse than judging with another guy who could not keep up enough to make a decision. Many times we had to run longer so the other guy could finally see enough, even after being down an hour or more. I don’t think some judges will ever see enough, even if you did strap a camera to them. Judges need to be in running condition just like the hounds, especially as the hounds are getting faster.
That's why I bought a horse but some places and clubs you can't use a horse. I just can't stay up with these dogs now days and I always tell the club that when they ask me to judge. Most are just glad to have a body for that day. I judged a big male class at Central Alabama this season. They have good pens and plenty of rabbits, big rabbits. They ran the little male class first, fastest, most accurate I've seen. They were just a blur, seriously. The two older gentlemen couldn't get near them. Before judging the big males I stripped off everything I could hoping I could keep up. Luckily that class wasn't as fast as the little male class. We even got compliments from handlers for our ability to keep up. I have I-Kam glasses that I've used to video my own dogs with. I would love to video a winners pack some day from my horse but I'm not sure about privacy laws now days. I wouldn't want to get sued by a disgruntled handler.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Just had our field trial in Michigan, a friend's daughter got her 13" female her 3rd win. Problem now is trying to get the points to finish her. He does not want to travel to get the points, classes are low numbers and getting points will take forever he says. I like what Mr. Will stated, should have 50-100 dogs in a class easier to get the points. JMO
 

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Doing away with clubs and trials is most definitely not the way to grow the sport Guys that have such problems with judges have the opportunity to take the seminar and apply the standards any way they see fit Less complaining and more action is what would fix judging problems Fact is simply this Most guys are would rather complain than get out there themselves and put themselves in place for criticism Lots of work and if you read most of these posts you can tell it is just flat unappreciated That is the problem JMO
 

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You got it right Jeffro. Following dogs in a field trial is one thing, the easy part. Following and judging is quite another. I believe the difference is most followers don't or rarely ever have judged. I think that field trialers are by far in the minority on this site. Which is ok since it is the "rabbitdogs.net". Out of curiosity, how many on here field trial more than they gun hunt? If you want to respond then just answer "Trial" or Hunt" If you do both then pick the one you spend most of your time training your dogs or.
 
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