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I want them to run the rabbit they are on until it is accounted for or I stop them after a long race. I do not like to pick them up in a check, not even a long check. I want them to learn to work the check properly, not to give up on it. If they learn that they will be worked or picked up in the check they will soon give up on the check and go off looking for another rabbit. I want them to run the rabbit until I am ready to pick them up, or accounted for it, not run one and drop it and have to jump another. Not run for two or three hours and brag that my dogs ran 4 rabbits. Why did it take 4 rabbits, unless you accounted for the rabbit, heck I have had races that I let my dogs run for 4 or more hours on the same rabbit. Yes, these long races sometimes result in the rabbit locking up and ending the race. If I notice the rabbit starting to act funny, I will stop the race to save the rabbits life.

If gunning I still want the dogs to work the checks themselves even if it may take them a while. I understand a gunner can account for several rabbits within a few hours and these long races I described above may not apply. What I am describing is a pack running one for a few minutes and dropping it and having to jump another to repeat it all over. WHY???

Good Luck!!!! Just my thoughts!!
 

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I agree, my favorite is when the chase has stopped and I walk over to find nothing but the tips of their tails sticking out of a hole and dirt flying. I want them to show me where the rabbit is. Not just quit and move on. I have had awkward moments involving mobile homes, pig barns, and RV storage but in the dogs defense, everyone knew where the rabbit went...
 

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Until they find it!
Amen!! One of the biggest complaints I have in todays Field Trials is handlers and judges always wanting to get a fresh rabbit after a brief beakdown. It ruins your dogs and makes them unfit for hunting. Hunting dogs are supposed to keep looking for it until they recover it, thoroughly and gradually working their way out. Sometimes it takes awhile. I've had 20 minute checks before. Some will say they just found another rabbit, well so be it. At least my family wouldn't go hungry in hard times. Dogs that quit searching and stand around at a loss need to be picked up, not catered to.
 

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For the person that started this post or any new comers to starting beagles below is what I do with newly started pups I start and I start lots of them every year for myself and many others.

This method works well for me where I start my pups.

This is not the only way.... but..... this (a way) that has served me well through the years and helped me set certain traits heavy in the dogs I breed, run and hunt.

First thing I.... DON'T DO.... is fall in love with any pups before they start. I fall in love with their performance after they start or not.

For me young newly started pups that have looses and.... CAN'T..... find them....are quickly rejected from further consideration at my house.

If a pup can't find his loose he don't have anything I want genetically...... period and is rejected.

Personally I don't care if he can learn to find it later on. I want that trait to be genetic, natural, bred in and automatic just like real jump dog hunt and grit.

If they can learn it later on good for them, they can go learn it with somebody else.

The reason for that is.... A pup that can't find his loss.....imo…. has other bigger issues....bred in.....that is causing this problem and all of those issues are totally unacceptable to me.

Pups that can't find a lose have genetic, bred in, bloodline, style, issues..... that I am not putting into my hounds for any reason period. Others may disagree that's ok....I don't care.

So

I only consider pups that can keep their rabbit going and going and going as soon as they start no matter how fast or slow that may be.

I pick pups born with the ability to instinctively and naturally do what is required mechanically to be a good rabbit dog first time out. As soon as they start. Certain basics mechanics have to be in place in plain site from the very beginning.

Loosing game is first and foremost unacceptable to me even for pups. If your good at finding a lose young then you will even better at that older. If your bad about loosing your rabbit young you will only get better at that. At my house learning means getting better at all the good things you were born doing correctly, automatically, naturally and instinctively from day 1 and already know how to do.

Pups that have to learn the basic mechanics are not well bred to me regardless of pedigree and are rejected.

Well bred animals perform well.... even as pups.

Animals that do not perform well at any age are not well bred to me no matter how impressive the pedigree appears to be.

Mitch
Amen

Glad to see I’m not the only picky person lol


Guys tell me I’m impatient....

Nope I know what I want and expect
 

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For the person that started this post or any new comers to starting beagles below is what I do with newly started pups I start and I start lots of them every year for myself and many others.

This method works well for me where I start my pups.

This is not the only way.... but..... this (a way) that has served me well through the years and helped me set certain traits heavy in the dogs I breed, run and hunt.

First thing I.... DON'T DO.... is fall in love with any pups before they start. I fall in love with their performance after they start or not.

For me young newly started pups that have looses and.... CAN'T..... find them....are quickly rejected from further consideration at my house.

If a pup can't find his loose he don't have anything I want genetically...... period and is rejected.

Personally I don't care if he can learn to find it later on. I want that trait to be genetic, natural, bred in and automatic just like real jump dog hunt and grit.

If they can learn it later on good for them, they can go learn it with somebody else.

The reason for that is.... A pup that can't find his loss.....imo…. has other bigger issues....bred in.....that is causing this problem and all of those issues are totally unacceptable to me.

Pups that can't find a lose have genetic, bred in, bloodline, style, issues..... that I am not putting into my hounds for any reason period. Others may disagree that's ok....I don't care.

So

I only consider pups that can keep their rabbit going and going and going as soon as they start no matter how fast or slow that may be.

I pick pups born with the ability to instinctively and naturally do what is required mechanically to be a good rabbit dog first time out. As soon as they start. Certain basics mechanics have to be in place in plain site from the very beginning.

Loosing game is first and foremost unacceptable to me even for pups. If your good at finding a lose young then you will even better at that older. If your bad about loosing your rabbit young you will only get better at that. At my house learning means getting better at all the good things you were born doing correctly, automatically, naturally and instinctively from day 1 and already know how to do.

Pups that have to learn the basic mechanics are not well bred to me regardless of pedigree and are rejected.

Well bred animals perform well.... even as pups.

Animals that do not perform well at any age are not well bred to me no matter how impressive the pedigree appears to be.

Mitch
 

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I always check wrist watch to see when they jumped, how long it has run, how long a check is, I let them figure the check out, that's their job. If it went into a hole then I want to know that as well. If it snows, first place I go to is the hole and and plug it with snow, one less place the rabbit can go to. JMO
 

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For the person that started this post or any new comers to starting beagles below is what I do with newly started pups I start and I start lots of them every year for myself and many others.

This method works well for me where I start my pups.

This is not the only way.... but..... this (a way) that has served me well through the years and helped me set certain traits heavy in the dogs I breed, run and hunt.

First thing I.... DON'T DO.... is fall in love with any pups before they start. I fall in love with their performance after they start or not.

For me young newly started pups that have looses and.... CAN'T..... find them....are quickly rejected from further consideration at my house.

If a pup can't find his loose he don't have anything I want genetically...... period and is rejected.

Personally I don't care if he can learn to find it later on. I want that trait to be genetic, natural, bred in and automatic just like real jump dog hunt and grit.

If they can learn it later on good for them, they can go learn it with somebody else.

The reason for that is.... A pup that can't find his loss.....imo…. has other bigger issues....bred in.....that is causing this problem and all of those issues are totally unacceptable to me.

Pups that can't find a lose have genetic, bred in, bloodline, style, issues..... that I am not putting into my hounds for any reason period. Others may disagree that's ok....I don't care.

So

I only consider pups that can keep their rabbit going and going and going as soon as they start no matter how fast or slow that may be.

I pick pups born with the ability to instinctively and naturally do what is required mechanically to be a good rabbit dog first time out. As soon as they start. Certain basics mechanics have to be in place in plain site from the very beginning.

Loosing game is first and foremost unacceptable to me even for pups. If your good at finding a lose young then you will even better at that older. If your bad about loosing your rabbit young you will only get better at that. At my house learning means getting better at all the good things you were born doing correctly, automatically, naturally and instinctively from day 1 and already know how to do.

Pups that have to learn the basic mechanics are not well bred to me regardless of pedigree and are rejected.

Well bred animals perform well.... even as pups.

Animals that do not perform well at any age are not well bred to me no matter how impressive the pedigree appears to be.

Mitch
Do you have a certain age that you talking when you say “pups”. I agree with a lot of what your saying just curious on the age that you hold to this standard? Thanks
 
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