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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Men, I have broke some right decent young dogs (2 -14 months, 2-18 months) however I did not train to deer proof as I normally do long before now. That stated would you recommend carrying them each by their self and finding a deer and turning them loose and shock if needed, or some other methods. I’m concerned about trying to hunt them in areas full of deer without doing something. If lucky, which rarely happens, some may be deer proof already, but want to be prepared for the worst. Unfortunately my tattletale dog has passed so starting new.
Thank You for any and all your thoughts!!
 

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JMO- I would find a deer and turn one out a time! I would then walk towards the deer and hopefully the dog will see deer 1st and if shows interest light him/her up. If they don’t see them before the deer takes off walk to where the deer stood and make sure dog crosses track and if shows interest light them up. This will show them that any interest at all whether sight or smell is unacceptable. I want them to :
1)come back to me
2)or go on as nothing was there and continue hunting.
After shock treatment I always try to get them on a rabbit quickly and really praise them for running rabbit. I like to shoot one in front of them also as it seems to really get them excited and hooked.
Repeat steps as necessary
I had one I couldn’t break several years ago and sold him as a deer dog but most will only take 1-3 training sessions. Key is to turn it up the heat. Some guys set on low settings and nick them. I don’t! I don’t want to have to repeat exercise again.As I said this is JMO and way I train.
 

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I think having a lot of deer can work to your advantage because hounds get used to them. I just let mine run rabbits and ignore any deer unless they try to take a deer. If mine take a deer, I yell/scold first then shock if they don’t stop. Usually mine stop when I scold them. I would never try putting them on a deer track just to shock them because I think that confuses a hound.
 

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I would do it individually as TJ stated then take out two, even you think they are deer proof, another dog opens and bam their off running. They are a pack animal and will need to be shocked with another dog if they go. You would have to shock them both. Keep setting them up, run where there are a lot of deer. Hopefully they learn quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank You both Huntsman and Foxxy!
What concerns me about not setting them up first is the fact of where I mostly hunt is super super thick and you won’t know if it’s a rabbit until they start to circle. If it is a deer they will have run it quite a ways before I even knew it.
I usually start with a mouse trap with deer scent on a cotton ball when they are really young, but I bought these pups from different places after they were past the normal age of that type training.
 

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Thank You both Huntsman and Foxxy!
What concerns me about not setting them up first is the fact of where I mostly hunt is super super thick and you won’t know if it’s a rabbit until they start to circle. If it is a deer they will have run it quite a ways before I even knew it.
I usually start with a mouse trap with deer scent on a cotton ball when they are really young, but I bought these pups from different places after they were past the normal age of that type training.
Ride around and find deer in a field, unload the dog just like you are going hunting. Walk towards where the deer is or was saying nothing and see what happens. Opens, fry him.
In thick areas the deer might circle up 1 time and bust out across the section. Go check for tracks and if they going out of hearing. Fry them, especially if there is no checks. They are on deer, fox.
 

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A friend of mine put deer legs in his pen with the tarsals glands still on. Every time dog came out of house he would push the legs into its face and fry it, took two times in 2 days.

Another guy I knew did the same thing and dog jumped out of the dog box and took off, guy would shock dog in hopes it would come back, it ran away farther. Never caught the dog, and lost his trash breaker collar.

A old timer who had beagles put a goat in the same pens that his dogs stayed in, left it in there to live its life some dogs still ran deer.

A man who had plot hounds for bear had 3-5 dogs in an out side fence pen on the ground. In the middle of the pen he hung deer legs with glands on it about head high. The legs were hooked to a electric fencer, dogs go up smell or bite the leg, got a shock, he swore by it.

I had a male 2 times to a pen with a live deer, they would sniff noses, that male got lit up, went to the fence and was chewing to get out, his eyes were blood shot from the broken blood vessels. 2 years later gave him away (no papers) to a old man to hunt with. Reason- he still ran deer.
GOOD LUCK JMO
 

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Hey Men, I have broke some right decent young dogs (2 -14 months, 2-18 months) however I did not train to deer proof as I normally do long before now. That stated would you recommend carrying them each by their self and finding a deer and turning them loose and shock if needed, or some other methods. I’m concerned about trying to hunt them in areas full of deer without doing something. If lucky, which rarely happens, some may be deer proof already, but want to be prepared for the worst. Unfortunately my tattletale dog has passed so starting new.
Thank You for any and all your thoughts!!
That's the way I do it. Find a deer and see what happens.
 

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JMO- I would find a deer and turn one out a time! I would then walk towards the deer and hopefully the dog will see deer 1st and if shows interest light him/her up. If they don’t see them before the deer takes off walk to where the deer stood and make sure dog crosses track and if shows interest light them up. This will show them that any interest at all whether sight or smell is unacceptable. I want them to :
1)come back to me
2)or go on as nothing was there and continue hunting.
After shock treatment I always try to get them on a rabbit quickly and really praise them for running rabbit. I like to shoot one in front of them also as it seems to really get them excited and hooked.
Repeat steps as necessary
I had one I couldn’t break several years ago and sold him as a deer dog but most will only take 1-3 training sessions. Key is to turn it up the heat. Some guys set on low settings and nick them. I don’t! I don’t want to have to repeat exercise again.As I said this is JMO and way I train.
That's real good advise.
 

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Some of the methods listed above are just flat out cruel. The best thing you can do to avoid having deer runners is to start out with hounds that come from intelligent, biddable, responsive families known to be deer resistant or very easy to break. There’s no reason to fight with hounds who have a strong desire to run trash in this day and time.
 
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